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Dog Facts

What every dog owner needs to know. Do dogs see color?


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Toys are fun both for our dogs and us. Lucky for us there are endless choices.

But did you know how important toys are for your dogs - puppies especially.

Toys play a great role in the emotional and mental development of puppies. They also act as solutions for inappropriate chewing, boredom, and separation anxiety. In fact most dog trainers recommend that new puppy owners buy lots of toys for the newest member of the family.

Variety is the spice of life. Most experts recommend buying different kinds of toys for your dog so that you can discover which ones he really likes.

You might be surprised with the answers. Berry, my 95 pound German Shepherd just loves cuddling up his stuffed animals. Who would have thought!

Trainers and behaviorists recommend that their clients have three sets of toys.

Primary toys are your dog' favorite. Leave these out for your dog when your not around. This helps reduce separation anxiety because your dog associates you leaving with his getting his favorite toy.

Secondary toys are the toys to have out when you are home. Be sure to pick up the primary toys.

And finally the third set of toys is used to rotate with the the first set. Trainers recommend swapping toys every 3 days or so. This helps keep your dog interested in all his toys.

And always choose toys wisely. Try to buy toys that match your dog' size. And always make sure there are no dangerous small pieces that your dog can chew loose and swallow or worse yet - choke on.

Margaret Svete, best-selling author, television and radio personality, and dog rescuer helps dog owners discover easy dog care tips. Subscribe to the premiere dog care ezine, The Dog Enquirer, at http://www.allaboutdogcare.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/

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by: Steve Johnson

If you have ever searched the Internet for "dog house", or "wooden dog house", chances are likely that you've run across several websites advertising a cedar dog house.

Most of these websites offer the same line of cedar dog houses manufactured by Blythe Wood Works, a company located in South Carolina that claims to be the largest manufacturer of cedar dog houses in the United States.

The biggest benefit of a wooden dog house is that wood acts as a great insulator against heat and cold. But the use of cedar means the house will resist wear and tear from the elements much better. Cedar is also know for its ability to deter certain insects like fleas and ticks.

We purchased the medium sized dog house for this review. Our dog Max, a 17 pound Beagle/Chihuahua mix, loves a good hiding place when seeking shelter from the mid-day sun. So this would make a great retreat for him.

Instead of buying the dog house directly from Blythe Wood Works, we purchased it from one of their online affiliates, Adams All Natural Cedar. The medium sized house was listed at $299.00. We decided to include the insulation for $125.00 and the floor mat for $22.95. Total cost was $446.95.

Purchasing the house through Adams is actually cheaper than buying it directly from Blythe. Blythe sells the house for $349.00, with the insulation for $109.00 and the floor mat for $19.00, for a total cost of $477.00.

As soon as we placed our order online, we received an e-mail acknowledgement from Adams All Natural Cedar. About 8 days later we received another e-mail explaining that our order was completed and shipped. A few days later we received it.

The product came in two boxes. After unpacking the boxes, we found the dog house in 8 pieces, including 4 walls, 1 floor, 2 roof panels, and 1 roof cap. There was also a set of screws, the floor mat, and assembly instructions.

The insulation was already installed within the pieces. The insulation is a thin, 1/8 inch thick piece of Therma-Ply. Adams All Natural Cedar says on its website is that' actually 1/4 inch. But it' actually 1/8.

Installation is fairly easy. You will need a #2 Phillips screwdriver, preferably a power screwdriver. It would help to have someone else hold the panels together tightly when screwing the pieces together. Otherwise, the instructions are pretty straightforward, and come with illustrations. Each of the pieces come with pre-drilled holes, making it dummy-proof. Just about anyone can assemble this.

We found the design and structure of this dog house to be top quality. It' clear that a lot of planning and refinement went into it. The base board rests on top of Wolmanized, pressure treated framing, to prevent against rotting. The panels are framed using 2x2 diagonal Spruce beams. All screws and nails are galvanized. The door way comes with a clear vinyl hanging door to keep the draft out.

Our particular house was put together very well. The beams and panels all fit squarely together. The whole house has a solid feel to it. But then, when we placed our order, we explained that we would be writing a product review.

If we were disappointed in any way, it was that the roof is not detachable. Both Adams All Natural Ceder and Blythe Wood Works, make the claim that the roof is detachable. But in fact, it is secured into place with several screws, hardly making it convienient to remove. But to their credit, the roof panels are designed in a way that you can leave them in place unsecured and they won't fall off and will still keep the weather out.

The floor mat is a 1 1/4 inch thick piece of closed cell foam. Closed cell means that fleas and ticks cannot penetrate. We highly recommend getting the floor mat. It helps keep the floor insulated from the ground. The mat is cut to fit the floor perfectly. We actually placed Max' sheep skin dog bed on top of the floor mat.

Overall we are impressed with what Blythe Wood Works has created. It is definitely pricey, considering you can buy a plastic dog house from your local pet shop at 10% of the price. But then who wants to see that unsightly chunk of plastic in the back patio? Even the wooden dog houses from other manufacturer' don't match the quality of Blythe Wood Works.

But perhaps the best review comes from our dog Max. It took only a matter of minutes for him to jump into his new house. Of course part of the reason for that is because we put his dog bed inside of it. But after having his house for a week, he clearly loves it. He'll be getting a lot of doggie dreams out of it.

If you plan to keep your dog for the rest of its life, and who doesn't, then give it a great house.

For more information, visit Adams All Natural Cedar at: cedarwoodfurniture.com/doghouses.html.
Steve Johnson is the publisher of DoggieNews.com
DoggieNews.com a daily news magazine for dog owners offering news of pet products, reviews, announcements, and the pet industry. Back to Top

Agility is Fun


By: David the Dogman

Agility most of you have seen on the Television. This is where dogs run through tunnels and go over jumps and weave in and around poles.

What can you expect to see?
Jumps, hurdles, long jumps, weaving poles and a three metre 'A' frame. No agility course would be complete without the tyre hoop, the famous tunnel and see saw. The equipment has been imported from the UK and is made to the highest safety standard and to Kennel Club Specification.

Can any dog do this?
Yes and all breeds and sizes provided the dog does not have a physical disability, such as hip displasia, and is not overweight. It is not fair to jump a fat dog. If you have any doubt about the fitness of your dog then seek advice from your vet.

Is there an age limit for the dog or owner?
Children are most welcome to bring their pets. There is no age limit for dogs and pups are encouraged for the tunnel work, see-saw and dog walk plank. Of course heelwork, sit, down stays, send- away is part of the lessons as is walking the dog off leash on the left or right.

Equipment for Dog and Handler
The most important thing is good footwear, shoes that you can run in and have a good grip. (Not like Ivy' shprawnzy shoes) Also wear clothes you can run in comfortably. For the dog although an ordinary check collar or half check are both good for heelwork practice, these are not suitable for agility. The correct collar is a leather or webbed buckle collar. Leads should be fairly long and made of leather, nylon or rope, not of chain, which can get caught up in the jumps.

What can we expect in the first lesson?
The first contact obstacle will be the Scale or 'A' Frame and is best for the beginner dog, although many handlers will not believe this when they see that the height is 2 metres. The width is wide and is a lot more formidable looking than a dog walk plank, which is also excellent for training the beginner dog. Many low jumps and of course the tunnel which all dogs love so much, that the problem can be keeping them out of the tunnel when they should be doing another obstacle. Young dogs take to the tunnel in minutes.

Control training
This is needed to get from one obstacle to another and as the young dogs progress we start to teach different commands to turn the dog to the left and right. A very important exercise for any dog is the 'down' and the wait. In agility training the recall follows from the wait and later on we teach the recall over obstacles. Another important exercise is the 'end away' to send the dog ahead of the handler. An easy way to teach the dog the send away is to hold your dog and get someone to put his food on one side of the room, then send the dog to his food from increasing distances away. Also practise send - aways to titbits and toys, having a great game afterwards. It is also an idea when a pup or young dog is doing instant down, to sometimes finish the send-away by downing the dog. Always remembering to give lots of praise.

You and your dog can have fun with agility if it is timed correctly and provided you and your dog are ready to progress. In my opinion it is important to remember that a dog that is happy and enjoying himself, is much more likely to try hard to please his owner, than one who is afraid he is going to get told off for making a mistake.

Commitment, Firmness, but kindness.


Do you have any problems with your pet? Then why not send your problem to DAVID THE DOGMAN. David is a Canine Behaviourist who works and lives in Marbella, Spain. Tel/Fax (00345) 2883388. His web site is located at: http://www.thedogman.net. David has his own radio and TV shows, and writes for many newspapers and magazines. David has been working with dogs for many years and started his career in Israel, working on the Border Police. He has been involved in all forms of training, including air sea rescue, air scent work, and has trained dogs for finding drugs. David has devoted the past 10 years to studying behaviour and the very passive approach. He does not use choke chains, check chains, or any form of aggression.

David The Dogman is available for private consultations in your home, for further details telephone; Tel; (95) 2883388

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Can Dog' See Color?

It is not true that dogs are completely colourblind. While dogs do not have the same color vision as humans, they are able to tell yellow from blue. Like a human with red-green colourblindness, they are unable to tell the difference between red and green.

The reason for this limited range, in both the colourblind human and the dog, is that there are only two kinds of colour receptors in the retinas of their eyes. While most humans have three kinds of colour cells, with three different receptor molecules sensitive to blue, greenish-yellow, and red, dogs only have receptors for yellow and greenish-blue.

Canine eyes also lack another human trait: the fovea, an area especially dense with detail-sensing cells. As a result, their detail vision is not as good as ours. But they make up for this by having much better night vision and greater sensitivity to movement.

Commitment, Firmness, but kindness.

Do you have any problems with your pet? Then why not send your problem to DAVID THE DOGMAN.

David is a Canine Behaviourist who works and lives in Marbella, Spain. Tel/Fax (00345) 2883388. His web site is located at: www.dogman.net

David has his own radio and TV shows, and writes for many newspapers and magazines. David has been working with dogs for many years and started his career in Israel, working on the Border Police. He has been involved in all forms of training, including air sea rescue, air scent work, and has trained dogs for finding drugs. David has devoted the past 10 years to studying behaviour and the very passive approach. He does not use choke chains, check chains, or any form of aggression.

David The Dogman is available for private consultations in your home, for further details telephone; Tel; (95) 2883388

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