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Dog Facts

What every dog owner needs to know. Do dogs see color?


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An essential to your dogís health is his/her regular annual checkup with the vet. The vaccinations* which are given to your dog each year ensure your dogís immunity to some common infectious diseases. And when the vet gives the vaccinations*, itís also an excellent opportunity for a thorough physical examination to be carried out, and a time to discuss any minor problems or issues which you feel may be affecting your dogís health or wellbeing. This is a time when your vet may pick up inherited diseases and the like (when your dog is young) so they can be treated early, or just kept an eye on. And as your dog gets older, the vet may find the early signs of more sinister illnesses.

I recently took my dogs for their annual checkup, and for the first time alarms were raised about matters of significant concern - it was thought that Kara might have early stages of lymphoma (cancer) - which, fortunately, tests then proved to be not the case. And Jet apparently has something akin to the early stages of cataracts in humans in her eyes, and according to the vet, Jet is likely to go progressively blind over the next several years. At least knowing this in advance gives me the opportunity to watch for any developing signs and, if and when necessary, adapt her outings and home environment to take into account any sight loss, and most importantly, it has made me realise that vitamin and mineral supplementation in dogs is actually a very wise idea.

Worming and ďde-flea-ingĒ your dog are the commonest forms of health measures which you probably undertake yourself for your dog. Fleas infest almost every dog at some time. Sometimes a lot of the time. Dogs which socialise with other dogs outside the home tend to become infested the most often. Fleas can carry disease and parasites, including tapeworm.

But fleas are extremely irritating for your dog. They often cause intense itching, which in turn can cause your dog to damage his/her skin by vigorous scratching. Some dogs are allergic to flea bites. Even after the fleas have been doused with flea poison and killed, the cycle of itch, scratch, itch, scratch, can remain.

My Rottweiler has been terribly affected two or three times now by this self-perpetuating cycle caused by her allergy to flea bites. Most of the skin damage has been caused by Kara incessantly scratching and injuring herself.

A dog with an infestation of fleas is neither a healthy nor a happy dog. So at the first sign of a flea, it' important to treat your dog for this very common problem. And those pesky fleas don't always readily show themselves. So if your dog is scratching more than usual, the first thing to do is a thorough search through your dog' coat. If you sight even one flea, treat your dog immediately. Some people treat routinely just because it' flea season, and still others actually treat throughout the year. And of course, it goes without saying that if you have more than one animal, you must treat them all at the same time.

This way, you'll ensure that your dog is as healthy and happy as can be!

* There are natural alternatives to vaccinations. For further information, subscribe to the Healthy Happy Dogs newsletter.

(c) 2004, Brigitte Smith, Healthy Happy Dogs

Brigitte Smith is a dog lover with a special interest in natural health for dogs. For your free special report, as well as weekly tips, information, strategies and resources for a healthier happier dog, go to http://www.HealthyHappyDogs.com and submit your name and email address. Take a look around the site - http://www.HealthyHappyDogs.com - while you're there - you'll find lots of useful information.

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by: Suzanne Clothier

Perhaps one of the most embarrassing behavior problems is a dog who acts aggressively on leash, whether towards dogs, other animals or people. Often these dogs do not exhibit any aggression when off leash. Though puzzling to owners, the difference between off leash and on leash behavior offers a clue to the problem as well as the solution. Recognize that on leash aggression always involves unintentional signals from the owner which create a vicious cycle. Here' how:

At some point, usually in adolescence, the dog growls, barks, lunges at or snaps at a dog or person. The owner is surprised and embarrassed, and not sure what to do. If not handled correctly, the dog may persist in this behavior and get worse over time.

Understandably, the owner begins to anticipate any situation which might trigger this behavior. Spotting an approaching dog or person before the dog does, the owner tightens up on the leash so he can control the dog better, stiffens his own body posture and holds his breath. The dog notices the change in the leash tension, the owner' body posture and breathing, and begins looking to see what has the owner so worried, and once he spots it, begins his aggressive behavior.

Did you know that the first step in attack training is to give the dog something or someone he wants to get to, while using a tight lead and tense body posture to excite the dog into a more aggressive state? In the case of on leash aggression, the owner actually makes the situation worse without meaning to, and the dog simply responds to signals received from the owner.

What can you do to solve the problem? Here' the basics:


Reprinted from http://www.flyingdogpress.com/
Reprinted from Zongoo.com Daily Press & Consumer Information
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Witnessing your precious dog or cat having a seizure can be a most frightening experience. During seizures pets often lose control, fall over, chomp their teeth, salivate or drool, whine, paddle with their feet, and begin to urinate or deficate on themselves. Their eyes become large (dilated) and unresponsive. A pet caregiver feels panicked and helpless while watching it all happen.

Hopefully, you and your pet have never, and will never, have to experience this shocking event. But, if you have, or if you experience it in the future, this article will help you to understand what causes seizures, what you can do while your pet is having a seizure, and the various treatment options available.

What causes seizures? Epilepsy is one cause. Certain dog breeds are more susceptible to epilepsy. These include: cocker spaniels; poodles; collies; german shepherds; irish setters; golden retrievers; dachshunds, labrador retrievers, saint bernards, miniature schnauzers, siberian huskies, and wire-haired terriers. Veterinarians are not sure what causes this ďhereditaryĒ epilepsy.

In cats hereditary epilepsy is unusual. Vets can normally find the cause of seizures. These include chemical toxins (which includes chemical preservatives used in many pet foods), brain tumors, feline leukemia, feline infections, peritonitis, feline AIDS, head trauma, and problems with the liver and kidneys.

In dogs there are many causes of seizures besides hereditary epilepsy. Allergies to food and the chemicals, preservatives, and artificial flavors put into the foods can cause seizures. Other causes include liver and kidney disease, tumors, poisonings, and low blood sugars.

What can you do while your pet is having a seizure? Try to stay calm. This is hard to do, but using a calm, reassuring quiet voice will comfort your dog or cat. Move any furniture or other objects on which your pet could hurt itself. If youíre unable to move the object, place pillows or wrap blankets between the pet and the object. Slide something soft under your petís head, but be sure to keep your hands and face away from his head so that you donít risk a possible bite. You can gently stroke his hip or side, but position yourself opposite the side of the feet and toenails as the muscle spasms make the feet curl into claws that can gouge or rake your skin. Dim the lights, and keep the environment as quiet as possible by turning off the TV and loud music.

If possible take notes about the seizure so that you can give details to your vet. Jot down the time of day it occurred, the length of each seizure, and the time in between each seizure if they are recurrent. Your vet will also want to know whether your pet urinated or deficated, if the seizure hit suddenly or progressed from mere body twitching, whether your pet regained consciousness, and how long it took before your pet appeared normal again. In addition, youíll need to figure out whether there were any possible triggering events. These include loud noises such as fireworks, unusual items that were eaten, and excessive playing or exercise.

After the seizure, pets usually appear lost or drugged. This drugged state can last a few minutes to several hours depending on the severity of the seizure. Your pet may respond to you, but do so in a very slow manner. Since seizures are exhausting for your pet, he will probably want to sleep afterwards. It is best to allow him to sleep, but check in on him occasionally without disturbing his rest.

If this is your petís first seizure, call your vet as soon as possible. Some vets will want to see if another seizure occurs, while others will perform a variet of blood tests to check for anemia, liver & heart functions, calcium, glucose, & electrolyte levels. Your vet may even run a screen for possible toxins, take x-rays, or perform an electroencephalogram.

The test results may not indicate the specific reason for the seizure. In this case, your vet may wait to see if another seizure occurs or he/she may suggest medications. If the diagnosis is epilepsy, pets have an excellent chance to live a normal life as long as proper medical care and follow-up are provided.

If you discover the cause of the seizure, you may be able to eliminate future seizures by eliminating the seizureís source. For instance, if the seizure is due to chemcial toxins, make sure your pet remains as free of toxins as possible. Provide human grade food and treats that do not contain chemical preservatives, fillers, or byproducts. Clean your house with chemical-free products. Also, use more natural flea, tick, & heartworm prevention products as some of these products may lower your petís seizure threshold and make seizures more difficult to control. Avoid products containing organophosphate insecticides. For safer heartworm prevention, use products containing interceptor and filaribits.

What can you do if your petís seizure condition cannot be cured and you realize you and your pet may have to live with the seizures? In the past, the only treatment options available were strong anticonvulsants that could have serious side effects. These still may be your only option. But, more natural approaches have been found to help some pets, either prior to stronger medications or in addition to them so that you may be able to lower the dose. There are a variety of treatment options that include a natural diet, acupuncture, nutritional supplements, homeopathy, herbs, and conventional medications.

As mentioned above, give your pet a human grade diet, free of chemicals and additives. Also, remove other toxins from your petís environment. Clean with natural products and use more natural flea, tick, and heartworm prevention measures.

Minimize stress in your petís life. Try to avoid sudden changes in his environment, loud noises, and other stressful situations.

You can also try herbs that act as sedatives. These include valerian root, kava, skullcap and oatstraw. Note that when using herbs and supplements, you may need to lower the dosage of other anticonvulsants.

Several supplements appear to help in preventing seizures. Try an antioxidant combination of Vitamin C, E, B-6, and selenium. Your vet can recommend the dosage for your pet. Magnesium and DMG (dimethyl glycine) are other helpful supplements.

Acupuncture is another helpful option which has helped to control seizures in many pets. Sometimes just placing an ear acupuncture tack in a dogís ear will stop seizures, and this only requires one acupuncture visit.

If the ear tack doesnít work, gold implants can be placed in different locations under a petís head. Or your pet can be treated with traditional chinese acupuncture.

As you can see, there are many natural approaches to treating seizures in pets. These should help your beloved pet to live a normal and comfortable life.

Deena Caruso, author, teacher, & distributor of natural pet products Helps pet owners create healthy, happy pets. To receive FREE "Pet Pointers" Newsletter, go to: http://www.healthyfoodforpets.com deecaruso@cox.net Ph: 760/758-7963, 877/877-0665

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/

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Dog Identification: Chips and Tattoos verses Licenses

Written by: Bill Knell

Web Site:   Make Life Work For You!
The trusty old dog license is quickly being replaced as the primary method of identifying lost dogs by microchips and tattooing. These new identification procedures have experienced a huge rise in popularity over the past couple of years, but there are some very serious downsides to these methods that pet owners may not have considered.

Many dog owners resentfully comply with local licensing regulations thinking that their money is being wasted. After all, why make your pet wear one of those annoying metallic license tags when you can have them implanted with a microchip or branded with a special identification number? If those are your feelings as well, you might be surprised to learn some troubling facts about alternative identification methods not being widely discussed.

Microchips are not a universal solution to dog identification. Many smaller breeds can be scarred by the process or experience health problems as a result of the implant. As a Chihuahua Breeder, I have heard more then a few horror stories about Chips and Chiís. Tattooing is another non-option for small dog owners because it can and does disfigure the animal. But it isnít the process of chipping or tattooing that bothers me as much as the results of what can and has happened when chipped or tattooed dogs are stolen.

Thefts of small or valuable dogs are on the rise. A great-looking Chihuahua with or without papers is going for well over five thousand American dollars today in China. Stolen dogs are also in demand right here in the United States. Puppies and mature dogs that produce them can be worth a lot of cash. But what happens when a thief who is familiar with the tattooing or implantation process becomes aware that a dog theyíve stolen has been chipped or tattooed? The answer is, too often, the unthinkable.

In a perfect world, your cute and cuddly pet accidentally gets away from you and is later found by a pet lover or animal control officer whose only concern is reuniting owner and animal. In such a case, chipping or tattoos work. But so do dog licenses! If a chipped or tattooed pet falls into the wrong hands, itís unlikely that the animal will survive the ordeal anyway because it will have no value. If an honest person finds your dog, the license is there to reunite animal and owner.

Although most jurisdictions unfairly target breeders and those who choose not to alter their dogs with higher fees, dog licenses have become a necessary evil in a world of irresponsible pet owners. With parvo, rabies and other pet diseases on the rise, many areas have been left with few options except to require proof of various shots along with license fees to insure a healthy pet population in their region. But along with higher fees and more vaccination regulations, many licensing agencies now offer perks to offset the charges and requirements.

A number of jurisdictions have simplified the process of reuniting lost dogs and their owners. Many animal control will first attempt to deliver a lost animal with a license back to itís home before taking it to an animal control facility. This saves money all around and is a terrific perk for those who were wise enough to license their pets. Before you go hi-tech with your dog, make sure you investigate all aspects of the procedure and eventual results. Contact other pet owners who have already chipped or tattooed their animals for feedback. Look for people who have had success retrieving their dogs through those identification methods and those who havenít.

Remember, your dog is not a car that should automatically be LoJacked because it has value. Your pet is a living thing that is affected by what you do or have done to it. Think before you act, donít do it because itís trendy and consider the old tried and true method of a Dog License as a means of identification.

Note: Visit Catís Chihuahua Puppies for an outstanding selection of quality dogs for discerning pet owners. http://tiny,azpuppies.com
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Evacuation Planning for Families with Pets

Written by: PetFriendly.ca

Web Site:  PetFriendly.ca

Wildfires, floods, and other natural disasters can place you in the position of leaving your home for safer pastures. Families with pets are faced with the additional responsibility of ensuring the safety of their animal companions.

Don't wait until the last minute to prepare for a possible evacuation... the more prepared you are, the more assured you can be of the safety of both you and your pets. Here are a few things to consider in an emergency situation:

* Take your pets with you. Pets left behind may be injured, lost, or may even die from starvation, exposure, predators, or accidents. Do not assume that you can later return for your pet, because "later" may be too late; you never know how long you'll have to stay out of the area. Leave early - do not wait for a mandatory evacuation order or you may be told to leave your pets behind.

* Be sure your pet always wears proper identification such as a collar with tags, tattoo, and microchip. You may also want to consider signing up with a national pet registry such as PetLynx, http://www.petlynx.net/ .

* Keep your pet' documentation organized and in an easy-to-access place. Include vaccination records, license, microchip and tattoo numbers, a recent photo, a record of medical conditions and required medication, and the name/number of your veterinarian.

* Keep dogs on leash and cats in carriers to prevent them from bolting in panic or confusion. When you hear of a possible evacuation order, bring your pets into the house immediately so that you can quickly leave with them if required.

* Pack a kit for your pets. Include food and water for at least several days, medications, leashes or harnesses, carriers, bedding, toys, and a pet first aid kit.

* Make arrangements with a trusted neighbor or friend just in case you're not home. This person should be comfortable with your pets and vice versa. Arrange for them to retrieve your pets and meet you at a specified location.

* Find a safe place to stay ahead of time. Ask friends, family, and veterinary clinics outside of your immediate area if they would be willing to house your pets in case of an emergency. Make a list of pet-friendly accommodations and ask them about their pet policies. As soon as you think you will be evacuating, call ahead to make arrangements.

Don't wait until the last minute to prepare for a possible evacuation... the more prepared you are, the more assured you can be of the safety of both you and your pets. Here are a few things to consider in an emergency situation:

* Take your pets with you. Pets left behind may be injured, lost, or may even die from starvation, exposure, predators, or accidents. Do not assume that you can later return for your pet, because "later" may be too late; you never know how long you'll have to stay out of the area. Leave early - do not wait for a mandatory evacuation order or you may be told to leave your pets behind.

* Be sure your pet always wears proper identification such as a collar with tags, tattoo, and microchip. You may also want to consider signing up with a national pet registry such as PetLynx, http://www.petlynx.net/ .

* Keep your pet' documentation organized and in an easy-to-access place. Include vaccination records, license, microchip and tattoo numbers, a recent photo, a record of medical conditions and required medication, and the name/number of your veterinarian.

* Keep dogs on leash and cats in carriers to prevent them from bolting in panic or confusion. When you hear of a possible evacuation order, bring your pets into the house immediately so that you can quickly leave with them if required.

* Pack a kit for your pets. Include food and water for at least several days, medications, leashes or harnesses, carriers, bedding, toys, and a pet first aid kit.

* Make arrangements with a trusted neighbor or friend just in case you're not home. This person should be comfortable with your pets and vice versa. Arrange for them to retrieve your pets and meet you at a specified location.

* Find a safe place to stay ahead of time. Ask friends, family, and veterinary clinics outside of your immediate area if they would be willing to house your pets in case of an emergency. Make a list of pet-friendly accommodations and ask them about their pet policies. As soon as you think you will be evacuating, call ahead to make arrangements.

Don't wait until the last minute to prepare for a possible evacuation... the more prepared you are, the more assured you can be of the safety of both you and your pets. Here are a few things to consider in an emergency situation:

* Take your pets with you. Pets left behind may be injured, lost, or may even die from starvation, exposure, predators, or accidents. Do not assume that you can later return for your pet, because "later" may be too late; you never know how long you'll have to stay out of the area. Leave early - do not wait for a mandatory evacuation order or you may be told to leave your pets behind.

* Be sure your pet always wears proper identification such as a collar with tags, tattoo, and microchip. You may also want to consider signing up with a national pet registry such as PetLynx, http://www.petlynx.net/ .

* Keep your pet' documentation organized and in an easy-to-access place. Include vaccination records, license, microchip and tattoo numbers, a recent photo, a record of medical conditions and required medication, and the name/number of your veterinarian.

* Keep dogs on leash and cats in carriers to prevent them from bolting in panic or confusion. When you hear of a possible evacuation order, bring your pets into the house immediately so that you can quickly leave with them if required.

* Pack a kit for your pets. Include food and water for at least several days, medications, leashes or harnesses, carriers, bedding, toys, and a pet first aid kit.

* Make arrangements with a trusted neighbor or friend just in case you're not home. This person should be comfortable with your pets and vice versa. Arrange for them to retrieve your pets and meet you at a specified location.

* Find a safe place to stay ahead of time. Ask friends, family, and veterinary clinics outside of your immediate area if they would be willing to house your pets in case of an emergency. Make a list of pet-friendly accommodations and ask them about their pet policies. As soon as you think you will be evacuating, call ahead to make arrangements.

Don't wait until the last minute to prepare for a possible evacuation... the more prepared you are, the more assured you can be of the safety of both you and your pets. Here are a few things to consider in an emergency situation:

* Take your pets with you. Pets left behind may be injured, lost, or may even die from starvation, exposure, predators, or accidents. Do not assume that you can later return for your pet, because "later" may be too late; you never know how long you'll have to stay out of the area. Leave early - do not wait for a mandatory evacuation order or you may be told to leave your pets behind.

* Be sure your pet always wears proper identification such as a collar with tags, tattoo, and microchip. You may also want to consider signing up with a national pet registry such as PetLynx, http://www.petlynx.net/ .

* Keep your pet' documentation organized and in an easy-to-access place. Include vaccination records, license, microchip and tattoo numbers, a recent photo, a record of medical conditions and required medication, and the name/number of your veterinarian.

* Keep dogs on leash and cats in carriers to prevent them from bolting in panic or confusion. When you hear of a possible evacuation order, bring your pets into the house immediately so that you can quickly leave with them if required.

* Pack a kit for your pets. Include food and water for at least several days, medications, leashes or harnesses, carriers, bedding, toys, and a pet first aid kit.

* Make arrangements with a trusted neighbor or friend just in case you're not home. This person should be comfortable with your pets and vice versa. Arrange for them to retrieve your pets and meet you at a specified location.

* Find a safe place to stay ahead of time. Ask friends, family, and veterinary clinics outside of your immediate area if they would be willing to house your pets in case of an emergency. Make a list of pet-friendly accommodations and ask them about their pet policies. As soon as you think you will be evacuating, call ahead to make arrangements.

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Tired of Vet Bills?


by: Deena Caruso

Do you make a lot of trips to the vet' office? Do you spend your hard-earned money on vet bills because your dog suffers from chronic ailments? Give your dog or cat the nutrition he needs, and chances are you can spend your money on other things rather than giving it to your veterinarian.

Nutritional deficiencies are often the cause of chronic ailments in pets. Most holistic vets believe that improving a pet' diet will boost health and vitality and often restore chronically ill dogs to health.

Pets need to eat a variety of fresh, whole foods. A balanced, raw, home-made diet provides the nutrients pets need to heal from the inside out.

If you don't have time to feed a home-made diet, buy the best commercial pet food you can find, one made with human-grade ingredients and without chemical preservatives, byproducts, and fillers. (These foods may be difficult to find in grocery stores and pet stores, but are easy to find and purchase on web sites.) Then improve on it. Fresh juice and raw liver are two of the healthiest foods you can add to your pet' diet:

**Fresh Juice (for dogs only):
Use a juicer if you have one. Most dogs love carrot juice, and it contains zinc, vitamin E, beta carotene, copper, and other ingredients that strengthen the immune system. It' best to use organic carrots, and you can add celery, parsley, or apple. Feed directly or mix with your dog' food. Try to feed 1/2 cup juice per 25-30 pounds of weight each day.

**Raw Liver (for both dogs and cats):
Some vets consider liver a miracle food because of its ability to save lives and improve health. Raw beef and chicken liver are rich in amino acids, protein, phosphorous, potassium, copper, and Vitamin A & B-complex.

Feed liver only from organically raised cattle and poultry because the liver stores toxins. You can add raw liver to the fresh juice you make or add it to your dog' food. To help sick pets, feed small amounts of organic calf or chicken liver once or twice per day (one teaspoon per 10 to 20 pounds of body weight).

If your dog has multiple health problems, supplements can also help:

**Digestive Enzymes such as pancreatin and bromelain help to replace enzymes destroyed by heat. Give enzyme supplements between meals.
**Probiotics and Prebiotics contain bacteria that help with digestion and fight infection. They replace bacteria destroyed by an inadequate diet or antibiotics.
**Colostrum and Lactoferrin enhance immune function.
**Vitamins and Minerals are especially helpful when pets have multiple infections. Choose a vitamin/mineral supplement made from whole-food sources. Pets can easily assimilate these.
**Amino Acids are the building blocks of proteins, and proteins are needed to construct every cell in the body.
**Garlic fights infection, helps prevent cancer, expels tapeworms, prevents blood clotting, and makes pets less attractive to parasites such as fleas.

If you provide your pet with the nutrients he needs, you should see a much healthier and happier pet. And maybe that money that used to be spent on vet bills can now go towards a new car, home improvements, a vacation, or even a savings account!

Reprinted from Zongoo.com Daily Press & Consumer Information"

Deena Caruso, author, teacher, & distributor of natural pet products Helps pet owners create healthy, happy pets. To receive FREE "Pet Pointers" Newsletter, go to: http://www.healthyfoodforpets.com or email at deecaruso@cox.net Ph: 760/758-7963, 877/877-0665

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Can Dog' See Color?

It is not true that dogs are completely colourblind. While dogs do not have the same color vision as humans, they are able to tell yellow from blue. Like a human with red-green colourblindness, they are unable to tell the difference between red and green.

The reason for this limited range, in both the colourblind human and the dog, is that there are only two kinds of colour receptors in the retinas of their eyes. While most humans have three kinds of colour cells, with three different receptor molecules sensitive to blue, greenish-yellow, and red, dogs only have receptors for yellow and greenish-blue.

Canine eyes also lack another human trait: the fovea, an area especially dense with detail-sensing cells. As a result, their detail vision is not as good as ours. But they make up for this by having much better night vision and greater sensitivity to movement.

Commitment, Firmness, but kindness.

Do you have any problems with your pet? Then why not send your problem to DAVID THE DOGMAN.

David is a Canine Behaviourist who works and lives in Marbella, Spain. Tel/Fax (00345) 2883388. His web site is located at: www.dogman.net

David has his own radio and TV shows, and writes for many newspapers and magazines. David has been working with dogs for many years and started his career in Israel, working on the Border Police. He has been involved in all forms of training, including air sea rescue, air scent work, and has trained dogs for finding drugs. David has devoted the past 10 years to studying behaviour and the very passive approach. He does not use choke chains, check chains, or any form of aggression.

David The Dogman is available for private consultations in your home, for further details telephone; Tel; (95) 2883388

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